Application of full waveform inversion algorithms to seismic data lacking low-frequency information from a simple starting model

Hyunggu Jun, Jungkyun Shin, Changsoo Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a method that is used to reconstruct velocity models of the subsurface. However, this approach suffers from the local minimum problem during optimisation procedures. The local minimum problem is caused by several issues (e.g. lack of low-frequency information and an inaccurate starting model), which can create obstacles to the practical application of FWI with real field data. We applied a 4-phase FWI in a sequential manner to obtain the correct velocity model when a dataset lacks low-frequency information and the starting velocity model is inaccurate. The first phase is Laplace-domain FWI, which inverts the large-scale velocity model. The second phase is Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, which generates a large-to mid-scale velocity model. The third phase is a frequency-domain FWI that uses a logarithmic wavefield the inverted velocity becomes more accurate during this step. The fourth phase is a conventional frequency-domain FWI, which generates an improved velocity model with correct values. The detailed methods of applying each FWI phase are explained, and the proposed method is validated via numerical tests with a SEG/EAGE salt synthetic dataset and Gulf of Mexico field dataset. The numerical tests show that the 4-phase FWI inverts the velocity correctly despite the lack of low-frequency information and an inaccurate starting velocity model both in synthetic data and field data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-449
Number of pages16
JournalExploration Geophysics
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • 2D
  • acoustic
  • frequency
  • full waveform inversion
  • Laplace

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